Ursula Emery McClure

Director // College of Art + Design Rome Program
A. Hays Town Professor & Graduate Coordinator // LSU School of Architecture
uemery@lsu.edu

Ursula Emery McClure is A. Hays Town Professor of Architecture & Graduate Coordinator at the Louisiana State University School of Architecture, where she focuses on the tectonic cultures of place and the physical manifestations of building.  In 2008, she and her partner were awarded the American Academy in Rome Prize for Architecture and they spent 2008-09 living in and investigating the Eternal City.  Her courses focus on her intimate knowledge of the city’s architecture and its construction through time.

Robert Holton

Assistant Professor // LSU School of Architecture
rholton@lsu.edu

Robert Holton is Assistant Professor of Architecture at the Louisiana State University School of Architecture. He has previously taught at Virginia Tech University, Florida International University, and Pratt Institute. He has worked with several prominent architectural offices in the US and France including Bernard Tschumi Architects in New York and Paris; Smith-Miller+Hawkinson, Gensler, Peter Marino Architect, and Peter Gluck Architect in New York; and Oppenheim Architects and Design GH in Miami. His professional experience spans a variety of project types and scales and includes the Corning Glass Center, University of Cincinnati Athletic Center, and office buildings for MasterCard International. Additionally, he has worked on winning proposals in Europe, such as the New Acropolis Museum in Athens, Greece, and concert halls in Rouen and Limoges, France. Robert earned a Bachelor of Science in Interior Design from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a Master of Architecture from Columbia University.

At Louisiana State University, Robert Holton has taught Comprehensive Design Studio, Third Year Studio, Advanced Architectural Techniques, and Advanced Building Techniques with a focus on the technology of building design.  His research is founded on the influence of context on the design of building materials, components, and assemblies relative to environmental, technological, and cultural influences.  This interest is applied through developing a greater understanding of the processes inherent to constructing architecture.  Currently he his working on a grant funded by the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio concentrated on the feasibility of constructing housing of compressed stabilized earth blocks in hot wet climates.